Tag Archives: Arizona Lottery

The Past and Present Collide

Marita Ralston, Class 21
Advertising & Marketing Manager, Arizona Lottery

This blog is the last of a three part series exploring how and why history is important to contemporary leadership.

“It is of importance to any modern city to know not only where it is trying to go but also where it has been.”  – William C. Jenkins, Mayor of Scottsdale 1974 – 1980

In my exploration of how Scottsdale’s history is relevant to its present and future, I found no story more compelling than that of Winfield Scott’s dream of building a “trolley line”.  In 1905, the population of Scottsdale almost doubled due to an influx of folks searching for a healthy climate and reprieve from freezing winters.  This growth fueled Scott’s position that Scottsdale should capitalize on eventually becoming “a suburb of Phoenix”.

By 1909, the Arizona Republican announced plans for a “gasoline-powered streetcar line between Phoenix and Scottsdale”.  But for Scott, this was just the beginning. The Phoenix, Tempe and Mesa Motor Line was intended to eventually connect Phoenix, Scottsdale, Tempe, Mesa and Glendale.

Had Chaplain Winfield Scott not passed away in October 1910, Scottsdale may have had a light rail almost since its inception.  Having lived in a suburb of Portland, home of the MAX light rail system, I can attest to the ease and convenience of this type of transportation.  When determining a position on the issues of today, it may be wise to remember words of wisdom from leaders before us.

Winfield Scott’s final will to the people of Scottsdale read: “I leave to you my work in Scottsdale. I had planned to do much this winter with you, but God has called me. If you take this work and do it…you will receive my blessing.”

No matter whether you’re a Scottsdale historian, a life-long Arizonan or a wanderer who ended up settling in our beautiful city, we can all share one thing: Scottsdale’s rich history and our responsibility for its future.

What do you think are the major issues from the past that continue to be relevant today?

Bibliography: Lynch, Richard E. Winfield Scott, A Biography of Scottsdale’s Founder. Scottsdale: The City of Scottsdale, 1978

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Discovering Your Sense of Place

Marita Ralston, Class 21
Advertising & Marketing Manager, Arizona Lottery

This blog is the second of a series exploring how and why history is important to contemporary leadership. Fudula is a class 9 graduate and a recipient of the 2002 Frank W. Hodges Alumni Achievement Award.

“Knowing what happened in the past, enables you to find a place for yourself here in the present.” – Joan Fudala

In a state full of people from other places, how do citizens find their “Sense of Place” and does that process differ from that of native residents?

Katherine Conrad, who has moved more than 20 times throughout her life, feels that everyone’s sense of place is influenced through their personal experiences. “I do not feel it is necessarily “roots driven” as much as it is experience driven.”

Conversely, Xavier Castro, a lifetime Arizona resident, says “The ‘native’ brings the history of the community into the equation. Sometimes the reasoning behind a decision or issue is not clear to those that are new to the community. This is where the ‘native’s’ tenure can help. It can also be a hindrance. The ‘native’ is not always open to new and fresh ideas.”

Myself, I’m a transplant. I grew up in Northern California and attended school in Southern California.  When I moved to Scottsdale after 9/11, I found it difficult to find a job and thus difficult to meet people.  After a few years, I’d settled into Arizona life, but still considered myself a Californian who just happened to live here.

Scottsdale Leadership changed all of that for me. I was lucky enough to be working for two Scottsdale Leadership graduates, Mark and Barb Stanton, who sponsored my attendance. The more I learned about the city, particularly its artistic history, a true love was born. FINALLY, I had found my place.

Whether a native or a transplant, how did you discover your sense of place?

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A Profile: Joan Fudala

Marita Ralston, Class 21
Advertising & Marketing Manager, Arizona Lottery

This profile of Joan Fudala is the first of a series exploring how and why history is important to contemporary leadership. Fudula is a class 9 graduate and a recipient of the 2002 Frank W. Hodges Alumni Achievement Award.

Joan Fudala, author and Scottsdale historian, has lived in many places. She enjoyed her youth in Ohio, but her interest in the world led her to eventually live in 10 different locales including South Korea.  In 1976, Joan accepted a position as Public Affairs Officer with the U.S. Army at Luke Air Force base, met her husband, Gene, a fighter pilot, and the rest is what we’d call history.

Joan grew up with World War II Depression-era parents who stoked her interest in history with family trips to Smithsonian museums and pre-historic ruins of Native American villages. As for her parents’ community involvement which ranged from theater production to pro bono legal service, “my brother and I got involved in almost all of their community activities, and they got involved in ours” said Fudula.

Later, as Joan traveled and moved around the country she felt like something was missing in her life. Her migratory lifestyle, while stimulating, was proving to be problematic in developing the civic foundation she’d experienced as a child.

Upon settling permanently in Arizona in 1991, Joan immediately felt Scottsdale to be an open and welcoming community in which she could finally put down roots and invest herself. Her exploration of Scottsdale’s history became more than a passion; she has been a full-time historian for 10 years and has written five books.

When asked why history is so important to leadership and the community’s future, Joan stated something that may sound obvious, but that we probably don’t remember often enough: “You’re missing an important perspective if you’re not looking at history. When you study history, you get to know past leaders and it inspires current leadership.”  She went on to clarify, “I’m not advocating that people live in the past; where we’ve been is fascinating, but where we’re going is even more fascinating.”

Do you feel like the past hampers or helps Scottsdale?

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