Tag Archives: leadership success

Effective Leadership and Emotional Intelligence (EI) Part 4

By TERRI RABICOFF
Scottsdale Leadership Class XIX

This is the fourth of a multi-article series discussing the relationship of leadership and emotional intelligence.

Organizations continually face the challenge of finding their next generation of leaders. According to an article published in the Northeast Human Resources Association (NEHRA), “Identifying leaders is not about simply reviewing a performance appraisal and making a selection based upon what the individual knows or does not know about getting the job done. Just because someone excels in a functionally specialized role – say, as an accountant or a computer programmer – does not guarantee that he or she has the qualities to effectively lead an organization from an enterprise-wide perspective” (2004).

The ability of organizations to improve performance through emotional intelligence (EI) adds to their bottom line and shareholder value by hiring and retaining a higher caliber of employees, reduced turnover, employee satisfaction and financial results.  Goleman, Boyatzis and McKee (2001) examined the question of what drives an organization’s bottom line performance and determined that EI was a major factor in successful leadership.

Over the past 10-12 years there has been the development of several multi-rater or 360-degree surveys that have been designed to measure emotional intelligence in the workplace. Many of these are based on a model of emotional intelligence called the Emotional Competence Inventory (ECI).  These surveys and raters have been useful in providing feedback on (a) someone’s individual strengths and weaknesses compared to others in the same organization or in a similar role, and (b) they also provide feedback on the gaps or discrepancies between a person’s self-perceptions and how they are rated or perceived by others.  These feedback systems are great for enhancing self-knowledge, leading to improved leadership behaviors, effectiveness and performance.

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Effective Leadership and Emotional Intelligence (EI) Part 3

By TERRI RABICOFF
Scottsdale Leadership Class XIX

This is the third of a multi-article series discussing the relationship of leadership and emotional intelligence.

It is important to understand that emotional intelligence (EI) is not a contradiction of cognitive (IQ intelligence), or even a conflict of head over heart, but a distinctive intersection of both – head working with heart. When you look at EI without cognitive intelligence, or cognitive intelligence without EI, you only get part of the solution, creating a gap in human abilities that lies between head and heart – more technically stated, between cognition and emotion. EI competencies involve a certain amount of skill sets in the emotional domain, coupled with skill sets in the necessary cognitive domain of that ability. By incorporating emotions with intelligence, you add the human flair that would otherwise be missing.

While technical skills and acquired knowledge are important, especially in an individual’s early career development path, scaling to the higher rungs of the career ladder calls for the exceptional ability to manage and lead people. Based on research, individuals that possess high EI competencies not only know how to understand themselves and keep their emotions in check, they demonstrate an ability to understand and recognize the value of other’s perspectives.

Research indicates that a person’s intelligence quotient (IQ) and training account for 20 percent or less of the differentiation between a star performer and an ordinary employee.  The remaining 80 percent more or less is attributed to EI. Due to the enormous impact EI can have on leadership success, findings may necessitate a change in the methods organizations use to train and develop leaders; and in turn, the way leaders train and develop their followers.

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