Tag Archives: learning to lead

Teamwork, great projects make us want to dance

By ROBERT LEGER, Class 21
Opinions editor of the Scottsdale Republic and Phoenix Republic

The tune was current, one all the elementary school children recognized as they ate lunch. They started dancing. A few minutes later, the youngsters were joined by silver-haired women who quickly learned the shuffle.

It was one of those “aha moments.” No one had planned this. It just happened, giving the people who put together this day of sharing between young and old all the affirmation they needed. Two generations connected.

Feel-good movies tell us one person can make a difference. But what can happen when seven talented, motivated people get behind an idea? Scottsdale Leadership has an answer, and it is amazing.

To read the rest of Robert’s blog on the Arizona Republic’s website click here.

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Using Social Media to Speak Out

By MELISSA RZEPPA, Class 23
Partner & PR Director – Serendipit Consulting

When you saw that Scottsdale Leadership started a blog, joined Facebook and started tweeting, did you ever stop to think why it was necessary? Perhaps your initial conclusion was that “everyone else is doing it” so we should, too.

Well, yes, everyone else is doing it, but importantly, Scottsdale Leadership is engaging through social media to speak out.

Like never before, people are using social media to have their voices heard. Millions of brands, organizations and municipalities are devoting full-time staff to Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube and many other outlets.  Thousands of groups right here in Scottsdale are engaging in social media every day. Whether it’s the Chamber, the City, a non-profit, a multi-million dollar business or a mom-and-pop shop; you have instant access to each of them and they are listening to you.

So, how can you use social media to affect change in Scottsdale?

1.    Be a grassroots activist.
Share your opinions about local issues, whether they are pertaining to education, development, tourism, politics… you name it. If you have an opinion, let it be heard! You could also support someone else’s opinion. Spread your message and share the facts so that others can educate themselves about the issue (you can do this by sharing links to websites or blogs with key information).

2.    Promote events and meet people.
Social media is a perfect opportunity to share community events that you’re planning or attending. It might help you sell tickets, raise funds, or meet attendance goals. You may also generate media attention by promoting your events creatively through social media. Plus, when you share the events that are happening in Scottsdale, you’re helping to promote our amazing city to the world!

3.    Say “thanks” to leaders who rock.
In Scottsdale Leadership, we learned the value of a simple thank you note (and of course, we shouldn’t forget that). But, you can also say “thanks” to leaders that you believe are doing a great job through social media. This is great because it’s not private and personal, it’s a public acknowledgment that you think someone has stepped up to lead our community.

Do you already use social media to speak out in Scottsdale? If so, how?

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Scottsdale Leadership Pays it Forward

By RACHEL BROCKWAY, Class 23
Scottsdale Leadership Marketing & Resource Development Manager

As part of their nine-month community leadership program, members of Scottsdale Leadership’s Class XXIV have been challenged to Pay It Forward. Class members formed six teams each with the purpose of developing a community service project that provided them hands-on experience giving back to the community.

The public is invited to attend Project Pay It Forward Day, sponsored by Discount Tire, on April 9 at the Scottsdale Civic Center Library auditorium. A panel of judges will select the winning project and a $2000 donation will be made to their charity.

The presentations are as follows:

8:30 a.m. OlymPALooza! ConnectinGenerations created bridges of communication, appreciation and mutual respect between seniors and youth. Team members: Marc Blonstein, Johnny Cervantes, Jennifer Clark, Ken Levine, Laurie McCammon, Suzanne Paetzer and Craig Whitten

9:15 a.m. Project Scottsdale STARS focused on raising awareness and funds for Scottsdale Training and Rehabilitation Services. Team members: Zack Barna, Nicole Corning, Patrick Eichen, Suzette Gibson, Jeff Jameson, Sylvia McDowell and Paige Perry

10:15 a.m. The mission of Check the Box project was to raise awareness and funding for the Scottsdale Cares program. Team members: Jacky Burke, John Damiris, Mia Darling, Mary Holman, Branch Johnson, David Valencia and Julius Williams

11 a.m. The Meet Green project focused on how community and/or business groups can conduct “green” meetings.  Team members: Kathy Coster, Michelle Evard, Kathleen Glenn, J.E. Pizarro, Charlie Popeck, Sheri Rayes and John Zicarelli

1:00 p.m. Project It’s Your Turn’s mission was to increase awareness of prostate cancer, fundraise, and encourage men to be responsible about their health. Team members: Kevin Classen, Chauna Cox, Stacey D’Abate, Brent Mekosh, Juliana Norvell, Jose Penalosa and Elizabeth Teitel

1:45 p.m. Providing the necessary tools to maximize the educational experiences of local K-5 students was the goal for project Classroom WishesTeam members: Deanne Boynton Grupp, Theodore Collins, Sona Koltookian, Joe Laux, David Nelson, Bridget Schwartz-Manock and Mike Seiden

2:45 p.m. Recognition of Winning Project

Photos can be seen at www.flickr.com and we hope you can join us to see all the amazing projects!

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Keeping Our Community Safe

By SUZANNE PAETZER
2009 Scottsdale Leadership Class Reporter

The Scottsdale Leadership Experience
This is the 12th of a 17 article series recapping Scottsdale Leadership’s nine-month Core Program. The program educates, connects and empowers citizens who are interested in community leadership.

How Safe is Scottsdale?
Forget the statistics in the paper (they don’t tell the whole story). Come on the journey in the life of a police officer and fire fighter. With over 200,000 residents covering 185 square miles, keeping our community safe is a high priority for Scottsdale! Class 24 learned that you may be 2 feet away from a criminal or 102 feet atop a ladder fighting a blazing building but the reality of danger is still the same. Courageous men and women put their life on the line for you and me every time they respond to an emergency. They willingly serve to make our community safer each and every day.

WHAT BACKS UP THESE BRAVE SOULS?
We have 750 Police in Scottsdale, armed with about 25 pounds around their waist -a gun, handcuffs, baton, and OC (pepper spray). We learned that since 1993 another device that aids in subduing a person is a Taser. Steve Tuttle, TASER International, explained 1.8 million Tasers are used at 15,000 law enforcements agencies – many equipped with video capability.

To read the rest of Suzanne’s blog click here.

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Effective Leadership and Emotional Intelligence (EI) Part 3

By TERRI RABICOFF
Scottsdale Leadership Class XIX

This is the third of a multi-article series discussing the relationship of leadership and emotional intelligence.

It is important to understand that emotional intelligence (EI) is not a contradiction of cognitive (IQ intelligence), or even a conflict of head over heart, but a distinctive intersection of both – head working with heart. When you look at EI without cognitive intelligence, or cognitive intelligence without EI, you only get part of the solution, creating a gap in human abilities that lies between head and heart – more technically stated, between cognition and emotion. EI competencies involve a certain amount of skill sets in the emotional domain, coupled with skill sets in the necessary cognitive domain of that ability. By incorporating emotions with intelligence, you add the human flair that would otherwise be missing.

While technical skills and acquired knowledge are important, especially in an individual’s early career development path, scaling to the higher rungs of the career ladder calls for the exceptional ability to manage and lead people. Based on research, individuals that possess high EI competencies not only know how to understand themselves and keep their emotions in check, they demonstrate an ability to understand and recognize the value of other’s perspectives.

Research indicates that a person’s intelligence quotient (IQ) and training account for 20 percent or less of the differentiation between a star performer and an ordinary employee.  The remaining 80 percent more or less is attributed to EI. Due to the enormous impact EI can have on leadership success, findings may necessitate a change in the methods organizations use to train and develop leaders; and in turn, the way leaders train and develop their followers.

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Community Service Decisions

By MICHAEL SEIDEN
Scottsdale Leadership Class 24

We all have our own reasons for getting involved in community service. Some have a passion for a particular cause, such as battered women. Others may have specific expertise that they want to share with a worthy organization. Some may want to have something that looks good on a resume. Still others may want to use community service to make business contacts.  In selecting what form your public service will take, it’s important to find the right fit between the organization’s expectations and your own.

For example, take the case of joining a not-for-profit organization’s Board of Directors. Directors roles can differ greatly from board to board. Some boards are strictly focused on raising money, setting expectations for directors’ direct contributions as well as their support for fund raising efforts. Other boards may require the directors to have specific business or other types of expertise to help support the management of the organization.

Time requirements are also a factor. One must be certain of how much time the organization expects its volunteers to donate and those time requirements must fit the individual’s lifestyle. While your boss may well support your community service, you don’t want him or her asking you when you’ll be able to find time for your “real job.” There are other factors, as well. Like any other good management decision, picking the right opportunity for community services requires investigation, analysis and a well thought out decision.

What is your reason for getting involved?

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A chance to Meet Harvey Mackay

By CHRIS IRISH
Scottsdale Leadership Executive Director

For many, Harvey Mackay is THE leadership guru.  I’ve always enjoyed reading his books and articles.  He’s smart and realistic, two qualities that I admire.  While his leadership advice is generally geared to a business environment, many of his concepts can also be applied to community leadership.

Mackay will be in town this weekend signing his new book “Use Your Head to get your Foot in the Door”.  All royalties will go to the Fresh Start Women’s Foundation – proof that Mackay is himself a good community steward!  You can meet Mackay on Saturday, 2/27 from noon – 6 p.m., Borders at the Biltmore, 2402 E. Camelback.

Maybe I’ll see you there!

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Turtle Leadership

By SUZANNE PAETZER
2009 Scottsdale Leadership Class Reporter

The Scottsdale Leadership Experience
This is the 10th of a 17 article series recapping Scottsdale Leadership’s nine-month Core Program. The program educates, connects and empowers citizens who are interested in community leadership.

Class 24 participated in another exciting Leadership Academy last Friday. The Leadership Academy’s mission is to illuminate ideas, provoke thought and stimulate dialogue to help class members cultivate their own leadership style. Class 24 focused on expanded leadership teamwork through a “turtle” exercise, led by Dr. Frances Mills-Yerger, Class 16, Workshops for Youth and Families. We were put into smaller teams and our assignment was to get our whole team across a massive flowing river using turtles (don’t worry, no turtles were harmed), and navigate leadership decisions to reach the other side.

To read the rest of Suzanne’s blog click here.

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Effective Leadership and Emotional Intelligence (EI) Part 2

By TERRI RABICOFF
Scottsdale Leadership Class XIX

This is the second of a multi-article series discussing the relationship of leadership and emotional intelligence.

He who knows others is learned. He who knows himself is wise.”
Lao Tse

Leaders need to know what makes everyone tick, starting with themselves. Many leaders do not often recognize, or take into consideration, the impact their behavior has on the very people they rely on for their success. Leaders must not only hold their employees fully accountable for “what” they do, they must hold those employees accountable for “how” they perform their work.  To do this, leaders must first be ready to take a straightforward look at themselves to make sure their behaviors are in line with their organization’s stated values, and that their leadership practices are supported by strong emotional intelligence competencies (self-awareness, social awareness, self-management & relationship management). This is essential if the leader is willing to build strong, long-lasting relationships and effective leadership.

Dealing with emotionally precarious situations in the workplace can become complicated, and leaders sometimes side step issues they should confront. When these difficult situations are compounded with inadequate communication skills, the end result can become extremely volatile.  The lack of ability to control emotions and display effective communication skills can lead to unsettled conflicts, low morale and diminished productivity. Effective management of employee frustration, anger and upset is critical to employee commitment, motivation and productivity, as well as to an organization’s overall health and profitability. The need exists to help leaders learn to use their emotions in a productive manner and, if necessary, to develop the needed skills for relating well with others.

The benefits of understanding how emotional intelligence competencies contribute to fostering strong leadership qualities for individuals and organizations has far reaching implications. “According to research conducted by Wilson Learning Corporation in Eden Prairie, MN, not only is there a direct correlation between employee satisfaction and job performance, but the biggest contributor to employee satisfaction — and thus productivity — is leadership” (Caudron, 1996, ¶ 3). Organizations can be instrumental in supporting this effort by identifying cultural and leadership principles that promote leadership supported by emotional intelligence.

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Economic Development: Do or Die!

By SUZANNE PAETZER
2009 Scottsdale Leadership Class Reporter

The Scottsdale Leadership Experience
This is the ninth of a 17 article series recapping Scottsdale Leadership’s nine-month Core Program. The program educates, connects and empowers citizens who are interested in community leadership.

What is Economic Development; How does it happen?
Scottsdale Leadership Class 24 members tackled this question on our last Topic Day. We examined it from a local, regional and state level…it was a fascinating day.

Economic development is a complex, multi-dimensional concept. Economic development is not possible without growth but growth is possible without development. Scottsdale is an established and resource-wealthy community. We’ve had many years of strong economic development. But in these tough economic times, it is important we have a clear economic development strategy.

To read the rest of Suzanne’s blog click here.

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